dynastylnoire:

::logs off::

dynastylnoire:

::logs off::

qrieves:

uoa:

tinysquids:

toxicwinner:

me

I fucking quit

i hate art

"where’s your homework"


 lolol smh planet full of idiots

qrieves:

uoa:

tinysquids:

toxicwinner:

me

I fucking quit

i hate art

"where’s your homework"

 lolol smh planet full of idiots

brown-princess:

samkidanuengirl:

charlottesharks:

Barbapapa, photographer Isabelle Chapuis 

this is fuckin brilliant

WOW!! BEAUTIFUL!!!!

savvygooner:

basedgodtookmyusername:

These tweets are KILLING ME!😭😭😭

That last one tho lol

fromgrapevine:

Happy World Vegetarian Day! We’re celebrating by giving you loads of delicious inspiration with our favorite vegetarian food articles:
8 delicious vegan-friendly foods
All about falafel 
How to make pita bread in 10 easy steps (so you can fill it with veggie goodness, obviously!)
The yummiest shakshouka recipe you’ll ever make

fromgrapevine:

Happy World Vegetarian Day! We’re celebrating by giving you loads of delicious inspiration with our favorite vegetarian food articles:

thefemaletyrant:

biolafromlagos:

lekki-babe:

thefemaletyrant:

atane:

I’m just gonna leave this FB post by Seun Kuti here…

I love my “Arabic” name, I also love my Yoruba names, my oriki especially. There was a time when I wanted to go by my Yoruba name and it just never worked, people would be calling and calling and I’d be walking away not knowing that they were referring to me. It was around that time that I learnt that my “Arabic” name was not really Arabic, all the Arabs who knew my name told me that it did not have a meaning in their language. However an Egyptian said that my name also meant beautiful girl, I don’t know if he was just trying to make me happy because my mother told me my name means something else entirely (apparently my name also means beautiful girl in five other languages including Wolof). I found out that my name is only really used by West African Muslims (oh and also South Asian Muslims lol, there was a Bangladeshi girl in my class whose first and last names were really identical to mine) although we all spell it differently. Furthermore, my “Arabic” name is only really popular in Nigeria among Yoruba Muslims, I know like three people with the same name and one of them is named after me, all of us are Yoruba. I am not as ashamed of not having a Yoruba first name as I used to *shrug*

I don’t really like Seun Kuti either lol…. Besides in Yoruba culture at least we give our children several names, I have a Muslim name (which is in Arabic and it’s really common), several Yoruba names, my oriki, and a name given to me by the Afro-Brazilian side of my family (but upon googling I found out it’s actually french in origin not portuguese lol), so I really look at this a different way when your child is going to be given several names, do we really need to wax poetic if one of them is European in origin? My cousins father is igbo and their names are all igbo, does this make them any more connected to their heritage? Nope, they refuse to speak Igbo or Yoruba, have no interest in our culture or heritage, and even have told me that they allow their friends to call them racial slurs “because its jokes”. There are far more pressing issues when it comes to preserving culture than a name, especially when that name is likely to be one of many a child will have. 

I think names are very important. Names reflect your language which in turn reflects your culture and heritage. I was born into a Muslim family. But my Arabic name is like my second name. Same for my siblings too. I guess that’s how my parents wanted it. And I really like that my parents did that. I’m even planning to remove my Arabic name legally and replace it with my oriki. Nothing wrong with having an Arabic name. I just think we were Yoruba or Igbo or any other before we were Muslims. If anything local names should take precedence over foreign names.
On other thing is that unlike Muslim names, Christian names are easily ‘yorubalised’ . Just putting ‘olu’ or ‘oluwa’ ( lord or our lord) in the name indicates that it is Christian.

I think religion is part of the heritage that people want to show in the names they give their children.
The reality is almost all Nigerians have names that reflect their ethnic heritage, I do not agree that having a “foreign” (in quotes because it is debateable whether these names are actually foreign seeing as we’ve localised them) first and last names means that these names take precedence. It’d be nice if none of us had “foreign” names but are we taking into consideration the way our naming cultures have changed due to colonialism? Ethnic/cultural identity (and language too) is not static, the kinds of names Yoruba people had in the 20th century are very different from the names we have today. The easiest example would be names that have the “Oluwa” prefix, like my own Yoruba name, these reflect the emphasis placed on The One God that came about after those Europeans started interfering. Does this not suggest that the “local” names we have now actually don’t reflect our history as much as our culture? I mean how many people still have names like Orafiyan, Odede, Adimu, Efunsentan, Ajaka, Aole, Onipede etc
Another thing, did we originally do first and last names? Can someone come and say that all Yoruba should not use first and last names because our ancestors never did? In the past, Yoruba women did not take their husband’s name when they married, why is no one talking about how we should revive this culture?
I’m not saying that having a name in your mother tongue is not important. I guess I’m just tired of people acting like if your first name is not in your mother tongue, it’s automatically something bad. Yes it may be a sign of colonialism but at the same time it may not be. My ancestor chose to be called Ali because he wanted to show his faith in the religion, it was his choice. I met a man whose last name was Thompson, and he found out that his ancestor changed his name because he was working with (not enslaved by, although it is necessary to keep power dynamics in mind) a white man named Thompson. Call it name by association.
There are different reasons why we bear the names we do, and it is not always the result of shame over our history and culture.

thefemaletyrant:

biolafromlagos:

lekki-babe:

thefemaletyrant:

atane:

I’m just gonna leave this FB post by Seun Kuti here…

I love my “Arabic” name, I also love my Yoruba names, my oriki especially. There was a time when I wanted to go by my Yoruba name and it just never worked, people would be calling and calling and I’d be walking away not knowing that they were referring to me. It was around that time that I learnt that my “Arabic” name was not really Arabic, all the Arabs who knew my name told me that it did not have a meaning in their language. However an Egyptian said that my name also meant beautiful girl, I don’t know if he was just trying to make me happy because my mother told me my name means something else entirely (apparently my name also means beautiful girl in five other languages including Wolof). I found out that my name is only really used by West African Muslims (oh and also South Asian Muslims lol, there was a Bangladeshi girl in my class whose first and last names were really identical to mine) although we all spell it differently. Furthermore, my “Arabic” name is only really popular in Nigeria among Yoruba Muslims, I know like three people with the same name and one of them is named after me, all of us are Yoruba. I am not as ashamed of not having a Yoruba first name as I used to *shrug*

I don’t really like Seun Kuti either lol…. Besides in Yoruba culture at least we give our children several names, I have a Muslim name (which is in Arabic and it’s really common), several Yoruba names, my oriki, and a name given to me by the Afro-Brazilian side of my family (but upon googling I found out it’s actually french in origin not portuguese lol), so I really look at this a different way when your child is going to be given several names, do we really need to wax poetic if one of them is European in origin? My cousins father is igbo and their names are all igbo, does this make them any more connected to their heritage? Nope, they refuse to speak Igbo or Yoruba, have no interest in our culture or heritage, and even have told me that they allow their friends to call them racial slurs “because its jokes”. There are far more pressing issues when it comes to preserving culture than a name, especially when that name is likely to be one of many a child will have. 

I think names are very important. Names reflect your language which in turn reflects your culture and heritage. I was born into a Muslim family. But my Arabic name is like my second name. Same for my siblings too. I guess that’s how my parents wanted it. And I really like that my parents did that. I’m even planning to remove my Arabic name legally and replace it with my oriki. Nothing wrong with having an Arabic name. I just think we were Yoruba or Igbo or any other before we were Muslims. If anything local names should take precedence over foreign names.

On other thing is that unlike Muslim names, Christian names are easily ‘yorubalised’ . Just putting ‘olu’ or ‘oluwa’ ( lord or our lord) in the name indicates that it is Christian.

I think religion is part of the heritage that people want to show in the names they give their children.

The reality is almost all Nigerians have names that reflect their ethnic heritage, I do not agree that having a “foreign” (in quotes because it is debateable whether these names are actually foreign seeing as we’ve localised them) first and last names means that these names take precedence. It’d be nice if none of us had “foreign” names but are we taking into consideration the way our naming cultures have changed due to colonialism? Ethnic/cultural identity (and language too) is not static, the kinds of names Yoruba people had in the 20th century are very different from the names we have today. The easiest example would be names that have the “Oluwa” prefix, like my own Yoruba name, these reflect the emphasis placed on The One God that came about after those Europeans started interfering. Does this not suggest that the “local” names we have now actually don’t reflect our history as much as our culture? I mean how many people still have names like Orafiyan, Odede, Adimu, Efunsentan, Ajaka, Aole, Onipede etc

Another thing, did we originally do first and last names? Can someone come and say that all Yoruba should not use first and last names because our ancestors never did? In the past, Yoruba women did not take their husband’s name when they married, why is no one talking about how we should revive this culture?

I’m not saying that having a name in your mother tongue is not important. I guess I’m just tired of people acting like if your first name is not in your mother tongue, it’s automatically something bad. Yes it may be a sign of colonialism but at the same time it may not be. My ancestor chose to be called Ali because he wanted to show his faith in the religion, it was his choice. I met a man whose last name was Thompson, and he found out that his ancestor changed his name because he was working with (not enslaved by, although it is necessary to keep power dynamics in mind) a white man named Thompson. Call it name by association.

There are different reasons why we bear the names we do, and it is not always the result of shame over our history and culture.

chironsapprentice:

Interesting article written by Sam Reynolds about the lack of Black Astrologers. Like him, I’ve gone to astrology conferences and have been the only black person there! What’s even more interesting is the fact that 47% of African-Americans believe in astrology. I’ve only seen two books written by black astrologers and I’m currently writing a book on the Goddess Hygeia in the natal chart.

did-you-kno:

Prince has used at least 7 pseudonyms to separate himself from the music he has written for other artists. He’s quoted as saying “I was just getting tired of seeing my name.” Source

did-you-kno:

Prince has used at least 7 pseudonyms to separate himself from the music he has written for other artists. He’s quoted as saying “I was just getting tired of seeing my name.” Source

the-adebisi-wombosi-identity:

nedahoyin:

windypicnic:

"Ellen Reads Her Chinese Viewers’ Names"

aka

Ellen mispronounces Chinese people’s names and she and her audience laugh at them cuz it’s racistly funny apparently

image

image

Ellen uses “American” interchangeably with “English”, as in, the language.

At 2:30: "This one, they didn’t even try to do American, this is just Chinese."

The comments are turned off on this video, but how was this even cleared to be aired?? Fuck you Ellen. This isn’t the first time you’ve been racist on your show.

This is why you weaboos/koreaboos/white ppl CANNOT give yourself a “japanese” or "korean" or "chinese" name for yourself (or any name from a language and culture that’s not your own). Whites take our names as jokes and we’re mocked for it in real life and in the media. 

image

We’re constantly othered, demeaned, and fetishized. Trash like you butcher our names and turn them into racist caricatures.

Our names are precious and beautiful and meaningful in ways you can’t begin to understand. Our names are carefully crafted together by our parents/family.

You trash don’t deserve to utter our names. Fuck you.

Ellen.. I was rooting for you..

why? why were u rooting for her? she often mocks and disparages black women’s bodies as well. ellen been problematic. par for the course. the nerd was barely funny as a stand up comic, but that was before a lot of yall time so a lot of “current” ellen don’t know who the fuck this saltine really is. boo this woman. but i mean hey yall root for the white gurl, some easy bake basic shit, cuz hey white gurl fuck yeah!….. nope

theawkwardlifeofapsycho:

Why is this not taught universally.

Please try and contribute to his gofundme if you can.